Screenshot of Twitter analytics' Tweet Activity screen, featuring charts and graphs about tweet activity
Analytics, Twitter

How to Find and Use Twitter Analytics

When it comes to social media, Twitter is a classic. One of the oldest social networks, this fast-paced microblogging site has 335 million monthly active users. Because Twitter moves so quickly, it can be hard to identify which tweets are doing well and how your account is doing overall. That’s where analytics comes in. So let’s take a look at Twitter’s analytics.

(Note: Since Ely Social doesn’t currently have a Twitter presence, the screenshots are from consultant Jalyn Ely’s personal Twitter account.)

How to Find Twitter Analytics

Twitter does offer both personal and business accounts, but you can access analytics for both types of accounts. Accessing Twitter’s analytics is easy – log into Twitter, click on your profile picture in the top right corner, then click “Analytics.”

Screenshot showing the menu that appears when you click your profile picture in Twitter on a desktop computer

If you haven’t accessed Twitter analytics on your account before, it will prompt you to click a button to activate analytics.

And there you are! You can access all of the analytics available to you in the analytics dashboard.

What’s in Twitter Analytics

The main screen is the Tweet Activity screen. You will see your tweet activity for the past 28 days (you can adjust the date range by selecting a time frame in the “Last 28 Days” dropdown menu). You will see a lot of data on your tweets.

Screenshot of Twitter analytics' Tweet Activity screen, featuring charts and graphs about tweet activity

At the top is an Impressions graph, which shows how many people have seen your tweets in the selected date range and a bar graph that shows how many impressions you got per day (blue bars) and how many tweets you tweeted on each day (gray bars).

Directly below that is all your tweets in that period, ordered by date (most recent on top). You can adjust this view by selecting Top Tweets (which will rank your tweets by how popular they are), Tweets and Replies (which will show both your tweets and tweets you made replying to other people, ordered by date), or Promoted (which will show you how well any tweets you paid to promote are doing).

The right column is line graphs with how well you did in different metrics (like engagement rate, likes, and retweets) per day as well as an average over the selected period.

At the top are a few more options.

Menu of Twitter Analytics, showing the different page options

The default view is Tweets. You can also select Audience to view insights about your Twitter followers (if you have enough followers), Events to see events that Twitter users are tweeting about, and under More, you can select Videos to view analytics about videos you’ve posted and Conversion Tracking to install a tag on your website to track who clicks to your website from Twitter.

How to Use Twitter Analytics

That was a lot! Twitter has really robust analytics for you to use. So how do you use Twitter analytics?

One of the easiest ways to use Twitter analytics is to explore your top tweets over the last few months. Which tweets got the best engagement? What seem to be the patterns or common themes? Or on the other hand, which tweets did really poorly? This will help inform what you should tweet about in the future to get a better response.

You can also look at your impressions graph to see what days your tweets do best. Maybe your tweets seem to get the most impressions on Tuesdays, in which case you should tweet extra on Tuesdays to maximize your reach.

Finally, if you have enough followers, you can look at the Audience tab to get data on them. Maybe you thought you were tweeting for middle-aged business professionals, but your audience turns out to be mostly Millennials. Knowing who your audience is can help inform what you tweet.

There are a lot of things you can do with Twitter analytics to fine-tune your tweeting strategy to get the best response. These ideas are only a few of the things you can do. Explore all the data available to you and see what you can learn!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s